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Music Has Sound Benefits

music benefits

The Skinny

Music has been soothing the savage beast and people for at least 3,500 years, according to the oldest known melody. Admittedly, a lot has changed since locals were blaring Hurrian Hymn No. 6 in Ugarit in northern Syria. Music now has seeped into almost every aspect of life. The reasons are obvious. Regardless of type, music is enjoyable, stimulating, evocative and more. Beyond this, it may also be good for your mind and body. WellWell explains how.

 

The Slate

Relieves Stress

People assume music can calm and relax listeners. Well, they’re right. Apparently, music can reduce blood pressure as well as heart rate. It does this because “happy hormones” are released into the bloodstream when people play or listen to music, reducing stress.

Strengthens The Immune System

Playing or listening to tunes can strengthen an individual’s immune system, at least according to physiologists Daniel J. Levitin and Mona Lisa Chanda. Musical activities lead to the body producing antibody immunoglobulin-A, which kills viruses.

Fine Hearing

Learning music can improve a person’s hearing skills. It does this by helping people isolate sounds. The added benefit for musicians is they are usually better at picking out particular voices and sounds, even in noisy environments.

Improves Memory

Playing an instrument can do wonders for brain power. It can enhance verbal memory, spatial reasoning and literacy skills.

Teaches Perseverance

Mastering an instrument takes work. No one plays an instrument or even a piece of music perfectly the first time—or even the first 100 times. As a result, learning to play helps teach patience and perseverance.

Makes You Smarter

Introducing music early into a child’s life is akin to feeding them brain food. One research effort, in fact, reports that “music training is far superior to computer instruction in dramatically enhancing children’s abstract reasoning skills, the skills necessary for learning math and science.” Other studies claim this kind of training also leads to academic success.

Improves Respiratory System

This shouldn’t come as a surprise but playing a wind instrument—think clarinet, flute or saxophone—enhances a musician’s respiratory system. These instruments thrive off air vibrations that musicians create, which means these players have to breathe effectively and efficiently to succeed.

 

Eyes Up

What does music do for you? Let us know at info@wellwellusa.com

 

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