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Work It Out For Good

Healthier Commuting Options

The Skinny

Even though a lot of people are working from home these days, commuting to work is still a way of life for many. Beyond it being kind of grinding and depressing, it is also a little bit risky during these pandemic-omnipresent times. WellWell may have a solution. No, don’t retire. Instead, look for alternative, healthier and perhaps more environmentally friendly ways to get to the job. There are plenty of options. Here are a range from the obvious to the outlandish to consider.

The Slate

Skateboarding & Scooters

Okay, admittedly skateboarding or scooting may not be for everyone. It takes lots of coordination and balance. But you’ll definitely get better with practice and when you do, your overall precision and coordination will improve for all sorts of other activities. Better still, calories will be burned—like between 150 to 500 an hour for skateboarding alone, depending on how intensely you move.

Biking

This is an obvious option and one that is standard in many European countries. It is also easier for most people to execute, while still providing a cardio and aerobic workout. The number of calories burned will vary depending on the distance, speed and terrain involved. But it will definitely help lower blood pressure, boosts energy, builds muscle and improves coordination.

Electric Bikes

Sure, traditional biking offers a bigger health boost than jumping on a pedal-assisted electric bike. But, surprise, a trip on an electric bike probably gives a better workout than walking, at least according to a review in the International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity. Hoping on an electric bike can also be a first step to getting many people back on a traditional bike.

Walking

If biking is an obvious commuting alternative, then walking is the most natural alternative. Granted, commuting to work on foot does mean the target distance is likely under five miles. But there are lots of reasons to consider hoofing it if possible. It saves money, protects the planet and provides a low impact workout that can help offset a whole raft of potential health problems. It may even help boost your cognitive abilities and creative thinking, at least according to a Stanford University study.

Jogging

Anyone looking for a more robust commuting scheme should consider jogging. There is plenty of evidence that shows a regular slow run is a great way to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, depression and anxiety. It will also boost stamina and increase productivity. Of course, there are distance limits to jogging to work and it is probably a good idea to have access to a workplace shower.

Roller Skating

There are endless benefits to roller skating to work. It is eco-friendly and fast, allowing any commuter to expand their travel range. It is also a great workout, burning nine to 10 calories a minute, while building up muscles in the calves, quads, and glutes. Plus, it looks really cool.

E-scooters

Looking to help the planet without working yourself into a sweat before arriving at the job? E-scooters may be the way to go. They are solitary and low on operating expenses. They are also extremely eco-friendly, especially when considering the gas-powered alternatives.

The Ice & Water Outer Limits

Depending on geography and climate there are even more unique health conscious, eco-friendly options that are possible under the right conditions. Skiing, especially cross country, is a tried and true method of getting to and from work in some countries, weather permitting. The workout benefits are obviously. Snowmobiling is another cold weather option that, while not necessarily eco-friendly, does offer a moderately intense workout. And yes, in some extreme northern climes, think Alaska and Canada, dog sledding can even come into play, although admittedly few people own a team of appropriate dogs or possess the skills to get them going where they want.

Looking for a warmer option? What about swimming to work. Okay, you’ve got to have a waterway that works logistically. But it can be done. Just ask Benjamin David of Munich. He swims the Isar River back and forth to work whenever possible. Not to be outdone, David Pike of Jersey City, New Jersey, commutes to Brooklyn during the warmer months via a jet ski, which is fast and a pretty decent workout.

Eyes Up

Do you have any great commuting options? We want to know at info@wellwellusa.com

 

 

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